Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Canada Doomed?

There's something I feel I need to tell you about, here on Life with Lynnie (LwL). 

Not just for everyone in the world.  But, to me, it's important for people who love here, in Canada.

Here's an article by theglobeandmail.com that's entitled, Canada 150, doomed from the start, now ends with a whimperhttps://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/why-canada-150-was-doomed-from-the-start/article37441978/.

Hmmm... did you click on the link?  If not, you'll be able to see some of what was stated (I copied/pasted):

Despite Ottawa's strenuous efforts, 2017 was not a year of coast-to-coast euphoria. Charlotte Gray explores how the reality of modern Canada couldn't live up to the official hype


Canada's sesquicentennial has revealed a lot about this country. For some Canadians, it has been a year of celebration – I've never seen so many "I (heart) Canada" T-shirts. But for others, it was a bust. And it highlighted some uncomfortable questions.
 
We should have expected these contradictory responses. Canada 150 commemorated an event – the passage of the British North America Act, which established Confederation in 1867 – that for vast numbers of Canadians was either irrelevant or, more seriously, damaging. The attempt to have a coast-to-coast carnival was doomed from the start.
 
The sesquicentennial could never equal Canada's centennial, which included the heart-pounding excitement of Expo 67, recalled with misty-eyed nostalgia by older Canadians. Those festivities took place in a country with a population of little more than 20 million, where Indigenous people were largely ignored and in which most citizens were of British or French origin, spoke one of the two official languages and were predominantly churchgoers. Most English-speaking Canadians were blithely unaware of the gathering momentum of the Quebec sovereignty movement. General de Gaulle's "Vive le Quebec libre!" speech from the Montreal City Hall balcony in July that year came as a profound shock.
 
It also stated (I copied/pasted):

Fast-forward 50 years to a country of more than 36 million people of diverse origins, languages and faiths. A country built on compromise, still juggling events, possibilities and protests released during a half-century of evolving national self-consciousness. A country that has undergone warp-speed growth, but is still riven by intense regional pressures and gaping inequalities. A country in which deeper self-knowledge has laid bare not just great accomplishments (military victories, social programs, legal safeguards, artistic achievements) but also patterns of racism and discrimination, and episodes of appalling cruelty.
 
No wonder that so much of the official sesquicentennial story was contested.

Plus, it stated (I copied/pasted):

But the most substantial and stinging protests came from Indigenous peoples, for whom Canada 150 represented a celebration not of nationhood but of colonization. The birth of Confederation was simply one more date on which their existence had been ignored and their rights trampled.

Thousands of messages of protest and discontent were tweeted with hashtags such as #Resistance150 and #UNsettleCanada150. Three days before the big Canada Day birthday bash, the Bawaating Water Protectors from Sault Ste. Marie arrived on Parliament Hill, erected a tepee and engaged in four days of ceremonies they called a "reoccupation," to draw attention to the history of Indigenous people.

Wow!

To me, this is truly amazing! 

Why?  Well, I'll have to tell you another time.

All I can say right now, is that I'm glad that the Indigenous people are speaking up.  And, preventing bad things to happen here in Canada.

After all, some of what is done here in Canada is evilness.

I'm glad that I don't get involved with wickedness.

Thinking of this, made me think of Psalm 84:10, "For a day in thy courts is better than a thousand. I had rather be a doorkeeper in the house of my God, than to dwell in the tents of wickedness."

Amen!  For a day in thy courts is better than a thousand.  I had rather be a doorkeeper in the house of my God, than to dwell in the tents of wickedness.

Absolutely! 

How have I become a doorkeeper, rather than had to dwell in the tents of wickedness?

I gained salvation by trusting in/believing upon our Lord, Jesus Christ.  I have a relationship with Him.  And, He provides for me.

For this, I'm thankful.  And, always will be.

Thank You, Lord!


Until next time...

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