Friday, March 26, 2010

Mask & Masquerade...

As I've mentioned previously, as a Realtor, I must attend twenty-four credit hours of education every two years, in order to maintain my real estate licence. Today, I attended an education meeting regarding the pending 13% HST (Harmonized Sales Tax) that is due to begin, July 1, 2010. It will be replacing the 5% GST (Goods and Services Tax) and the 8% PST (Provincial Sales Tax), that we pay currently, here in Ontario.

The difference is, that currently, not all goods and services are currently taxed by both GST & PST. However, after once the HST comes into effect, most goods and services will be subject to HST. While our government justifies the end by the means, we are just supposed to smile and accept it (like wearing a mask), whether we want this or not. Prepare yourself! We are in the process of being taxed...to death.

Talking about accepting life... as per usual, I thought of Gordon and my upcoming wedding anniversary, this coming Monday. I thought about, 'The Phantom of the Opera'. It was musical that we both loved. In fact, we saw 'The Phantom' both in Toronto, Ontario and London, England.

In the summer of 2000, on July 15th, we first attended a play at St. Martin's Theatre: Mousetrap by Agatha Christie. We enjoyed this immensely.

Afterwards, we took a ride in a London cab (taxi) and headed for Her Majesty's Theatre, where we thoroughly enjoyed: The Phantom of the Opera by Andrew Lloyd Webber.






What a wonderful day we had! It's not just seeing about seeing plays/musicals, together in London, England; although that was wonderful! But, you see, we loved, 'The Phantom of the Opera'.
One of Gordon's favourite songs from 'The Phantom' is, 'Masquerade'. Why? I don't really know. I just know Gordon enjoyed that music.
This reminded me of how we all wear masks, to some extent.
Every day, I seem to write about my heartbreak over Gordon's death, my grief, etc. I do so, for I believe it helps me to have a voice, to say/write my feelings, somehow justifying my brokenheartedness. Yet, during everyday life, I do not focus on my pain or loss.
As other people do, I go about my business doing what I need to do. I focus on what I need to focus on. Even if there are times that tears run down my cheeks, for the most part, I don't let on about any pain I am feeling. Some people don't even know my husband died.
Others, like some of my church family, think and tell me that I am a rock; for I smile, continue contributing where I can for God's work, and generally just don't look like I'm grieving. Even though I am.
Gordon is never far from my thoughts.
Until next time...